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May 1923

ULCERATIVE STOMATITIS AND ITS TREATMENT BY THE INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF ARSENIC

Author Affiliations

TORONTO
From the wards and outpatient department of the Hospital for Sick Children.

Am J Dis Child. 1923;25(5):354-358. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.01920050017003
Abstract

Those who were in the service during the recent war and particularly those who served in any one of the fields of battle will recall the disease which was more or less prevalent among the rank and file and which was popularly known as trench mouth. The condition was not serious in that it did not impair the man's fighting efficiency, but it was annoying because of its contagiousness and its resistance to treatment. The frequency with which this condition has been encountered during the last two years among the children of this city has excited no little comment. It is designated by several names: suppurative gingivitis, Vincent's angina, trench mouth and ulcerative stomatitis. The latter term has been used, however, to describe two conditions which, I believe, are not identical either etiologically or clinically, but which frequently coexist in the same patient.

The terms Vincent's angina, trench mouth and

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