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June 1923

A CASE OF CEREBRAL CYST IN AN INFANT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Jacobi Division for Children, Lenox Hill Hospital, Dr. A. L. Goodman, Director.

Am J Dis Child. 1923;25(6):435-440. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.01920060024002
Abstract

Cysts of the brain are of infrequent occurrence, and their detection clinically is extremely difficult. In the majority of cases, the condition is diagnosed only by postmortem examination. The case reported herewith presented several interesting features, briefly: (1) the sudden onset of symptoms simulating an acute infectious process; (2) indefinite signs and symptoms, making an antemortem diagnosis impossible, and (3) the presence of hyperglycemia and glycosuria.

In reviewing the literature, it is of interest to note that Starr,1 who collected 299 cases of brain tumors in children, found that thirty of these, or nearly 10 per cent., were cysts. The locations were: basal ganglion and lateral ventricle, 1; pons, 1; medulla, 1; base, 1; cerebellum, 9, and centrum ovale, 15. Two of the tumors were multiple. Several interesting cases have been reported, occurring in adults. Anglade2 reported a case of hydatid cyst of the brain. His patient, a

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