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September 1923

RICKETS IN RELATION TO THE INORGANIC PHOSPHATE AND CALCIUM IN MATERNAL AND FETAL BLOOD

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University NEW YORK

Am J Dis Child. 1923;26(3):285-289. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.04120150092010
Abstract

Whatever may be the conceptions regarding the pathogenesis of rickets, they all concern themselves to some extent with the metabolism of phosphorus and calcium. In infantile rickets, the inorganic phosphorus of the blood is almost regularly diminished; whereas, in tetany—a disorder intimately associated with rickets—the calcium content is diminished. It is becoming increasingly evident that rickets occurs earlier in infancy than was formerly believed: that it is a disorder frequently present in the first half of the first year of life. In Schmorl's statistics, which are based on necropsy findings, 97 per cent, of the infants between the ages of 4 and 6 months showed histologic evidence of rickets. When the matter was viewed in this light, and the possibility that prenatal disturbances of metabolism may play a rôle in the etiology was considered, it seemed worth while to ascertain the calcium and phosphorus content of the blood of

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