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June 1924

THE EFFECT OF FLUID ON THE TEMPERATURE AND BLOOD CONCENTRATION IN THE NEW-BORN WITH FEVER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; JAPAN
From the Pediatric Service, the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1924;27(6):578-585. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1924.01920120040006
Abstract

In a previous paper1 evidence was presented to show that a close relationship exists between fever in the new-born and dehydration. Whereas in afebrile new-born infants the protein concentration of blood serum is fairly constant, usually lying between 6 and 7 per cent., in the new-born with fever the serum proteins are generally above 7.5 per cent, and often over 9 per cent., indicating a marked diminution in the plasma water.

In the experiments reported in this paper the effect of fluid therapy on the temperature and blood concentration of the new-born with fever was studied. Approximately 35 c.c. of fluid per kilogram of body weight (a total of from 100 to 150 c.c.), warmed above the temperature of the baby, were given and the temperature and blood concentration determined repeatedly before and after the fluid administration. The fluid was given in various ways—orally (gavage), hypodermically and intraperitoneally. The

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