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September 1925

THE NITROGEN AND MINERAL BALANCES IN INFANTS RECEIVING COW'S AND GOAT'S MILK

Am J Dis Child. 1925;30(3):359-366. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1925.01920150075009
Abstract

Goat's milk is occasionally urged as a food for infants (1) because a milch goat can be cared for on a small plot of land by the individual family, thereby making available a supply of fresh milk in not too large amounts, and (2) because goat's milk has seemed to be better adapted to infant nutrition than cow's milk.1 However, apart from the generally accepted fact that goat's milk is largely free from Bacillus tuberculosis, there are, so far as we have been able to find, few data showing wherein goat's milk is superior to cow's milk for infant feeding. The composition of milk from a mixed herd compares with that of cow's milk, although among individual goats there may be considerable variation. The casein of goat's milk appears to be the same as that of cow's milk. The relation of casein to lactalbumin in the two milks does

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