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December 1926

A COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING OF FRUITS AND MILK ON THE GROWTH OF CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

BERKELEY, CALIF.
From the Laboratory of Household Science, the University of California.

Am J Dis Child. 1926;32(6):839-849. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1926.04130120036003
Abstract

A study made in this laboratory by M. S. Chaney1 indicated that not all undernourished children are best treated by the feeding of supplementary lunches of milk and crackers, according to the widespread custom in American public schools. She found that school children given an orange daily, in place of the milk, made on the average better growth during the two eight-week periods of observation than did the milk-fed children, and both made considerably better growth than did the control group which received no supplementary lunch. The chief criterion of growth used in this study was gain in weight, although standing and sitting heights were taken also. The children examined came from homes of good economic condition, so that the total quantity and the variety of food supplied were probably adequate. Apparently also these families served plenty of milk at home, although no exact information on this point was

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