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March 1927

TRANSFUSED BLOOD IN INFANTS WITH SEVERE MALNUTRITION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; KANSAS CITY, MO.; NEW YORK
From the Pediatric Division of the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1927;33(3):442-450. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1927.04130150081007
Abstract

During recent years, blood transfusion has been widely used in the treatment of severe malnutrition. The general impression is that this form of therapy is beneficial in many conditions, yet little is known regarding the manner in which it exerts its favorable action. This study represents an attempt to establish some rational basis for the treatment. The total volume of blood before and after transfusion was estimated to learn what change in the bulk of the circulating fluid had occurred and whether it was due to change in the volume of plasma or to corpuscles, or to both. The serum proteins and the hemoglobin were also estimated.

It has been suggested that antibodies pass from donor to recipient during transfusion, and hence blood from immunized persons has been used in the treatment of sepsis. The only antibody-like substances available for study in any quantity are the iso-agglutinins. Though the cells

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