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Scarlet Fever
June 1928

VI. THE RELATION BETWEEN THE LOSS OF SKIN SENSITIVITY TO TOXIN AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANTITOXIC IMMUNITY DURING ARTIFICIAL IMMUNIZATION

Author Affiliations

WITH THE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE OF LUCILLE ERMATINGER, A.M. ST. LOUIS
From From the Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine and the Shriner's Hospital for Crippled Children.

Am J Dis Child. 1928;35(6):974-982. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920240021004
Abstract

The active immunization against scarlet fever by repeated injections at weekly intervals of scarlatinal streptococcus filtrate toxin as described by Dick and Dick1 has been reported by a number of observers. It is said that following such injections an immunity usually develops which lasts from several months to a year and a half or possibly longer. The assumption of immunity is based not only on a decreased incidence of clinical scarlet fever in such injected persons, but chiefly on the fact that the reaction to the Dick test, or skin sensitivity to a small amount of toxin, is rendered negative by the injections of toxin. This loss of sensitivity of the skin has been thought to depend on the production of a specific scarlatinal antitoxin, such as occurs in patients convalescing from cases of clinical scarlet fever.

In a previous paper,2 it was suggested that the skin reaction

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