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September 1928

THE RÔLE OF HEMOLYSIS IN JAUNDICE OF THE NEW-BORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

BRYN MAWR, PA.
From the Department of Pediatrics and the William Pepper Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Am J Dis Child. 1928;36(3):486-501. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920270063007
Abstract

In 1882, Hofmeier1 first suggested a hematogenous origin for jaundice of the new-born infant. For years this theory received little attention, but evidence gradually accumulated which led writers on the subject to grant it a rôle of minor importance, then to assign it a parity with hepatogenous factors, and finally to advance it as the sole cause of this condition.

In 1912, Hess2 dismissed blood destruction as being a primary cause of jaundice, on the following grounds: First, when the liver is extirpated, jaundice cannot be induced; second, the finding of bile acids in the pericardial fluid of jaundiced babies proves the participation of the liver; third, free hemoglobin cannot be found in the blood of the new-born infant; fourth, jaundice cannot be produced by the injection of hemoglobin, and fifth, jaundice does not follow transfusion. Today each of these objections can be met. Whipple and Hooper3

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