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November 1928

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PRENATAL FACTOR IN THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF INFANTS TO RICKETS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1928;36(5):966-971. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920290094004
Abstract

It has long been recognized that there is a distinct individual susceptibility to the development of rickets—that infants brought up apparently under the same environment and given the same diet differ markedly in their tendency to develop this disorder. Formerly, clinicians were content to call attention to this phenomenon, but recently children's specialists and biochemists have attempted to harmonize this observation with the newer knowledge, and have predicated a prenatal lack of the antirachitic factor in infants who showed a predisposition to rickets and, on the other hand, a storage in those who showed no such tendency. The analogy for this hypothesis is the well known theory of Bunge in relation to anemia. It will be remembered that this physiologist ascribed the development of anemia in later infancy, and the vulnerability of certain infants in particular, to a lack of an "Eisendepot" in the liver. Similarly, in regard to rickets,

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