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November 1928

STIMULATION OF GROWTH OF SCHOOL CHILDREN BY SMALL SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDINGS

Author Affiliations

BERKELEY, CALIF.
From the Laboratory of Household Science, the University of California.

Am J Dis Child. 1928;36(5):972-978. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920290100005
Abstract

A number of studies have been made by the Household Science Department of the University of California on the effect of supplementary lunches on the growth of school children. The first of these by Chaney1 was carried on in 1923 in the Claremont school in Oakland, Calif., with children of families belonging for the most part to the higher economic and social groupings. This study covered the growth and physical status of 109 and 140 children observed during two eight-week periods of supplementary feeding. One orange and two graham crackers or half a pint of whole milk and two graham crackers were used, and a definite advantage was seen in the groups fed on oranges. All children in these groups were 7 per cent or more underweight for height and age according to the Wood scale of 1920. All groups of children fed with oranges, orange and milk, orange-ade

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