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September 1929

GROWTH IN INFANTS FROM THE STANDPOINT OF PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS AND NITROGEN METABOLISMIII. URIC ACID

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Nutrition, Iowa Child Welfare Research Station, State University of Iowa.

Am J Dis Child. 1929;38(3):507-512. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930090059007
Abstract

In infants, endogenous uric acid has been shown to be excreted in much larger amounts proportionately than in adults. This appears to be due, in part, at least, to the relatively larger amount of glandular tissue, which comprises nearly one half of the total body substance of the infant. Other factors, for example, the amount of protein ingested and possibly the amount of carbohydrate, which in the adult has been shown to stimulate cellular metabolism, may have some influence. Roughichitch suggested that in the artificially fed infant the excretion of high amounts of uric acid may be the result of the proportionately high intake of protein, although in his recent study he did not find a close relationship between the urinary nitrogen and uric acid.2 Orgler3 believed that the lower output of uric acid of the breast-fed infant is due to the better utilization of the ingested food.

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