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April 1930

THE GROWTH AND NITROGEN METABOLISM OF INFANTS RECEIVING UNDILUTED MILK

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, State University of Iowa.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;39(4):701-710. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930160019003
Abstract

For some time, ideas concerning growth have been undergoing a change. The rate of growth has been shown definitely to depend on the character and quantity of the food intake; consequently, as diets are improved, standards of growth become obsolete and are replaced by new ones. The present standards are based on averages of the growth of children who in all probability were not receiving an optimum diet. Chi Che Wang1 observed that greater growth was obtained in children when the protein intake was approximately twice the accepted average requirement. The growth of a group of carefully supervised diabetic children2 was found to exceed that which might be expected according to the usual standards for well children. Daniels3 demonstrated that this principle is applicable also to infants. Though the infants observed by her received diluted milk, the food intake was greater than that administered for similar observations

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