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Case Reports
June 1930

THE DANGER OF MOUTH-TO-MOUTH BREATHING IN RESUSCITATION OF THE NEW-BORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;39(6):1268-1269. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930180118011
Abstract

Of the various modes of resuscitating an asphyxiated new-born infant, direct mouth-to-mouth insufflation of the lungs enjoys great popularity among practitioners. Although it is probably the easiest and quickest method of filling the collapsed lungs of the child with air, the danger of rupturing the delicate alveoli by too much force, and of producing a pneumothorax is considerable. For this reason many authors either warn against its use altogether or sponsor it only if most painstaking precautions are observed.

How well founded their objections are may be seen from the following case.

REPORT OF CASE  A sextipara, aged 42, near term, was admitted to the hospital with profuse bleeding. The cause of the bleeding was a placenta praevia centralis, and as the case was further complicated by a transverse position of the fetus, cesarean section was decided on and performed by the chief of the department, Dr. George Gellhorn. The

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