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Progress in Pediatrics
June 1930

THE PRACTICE OF INOCULATION RECOMMENDED IN A SERMON BY THE REVEREND WILLIAM DODD, 1767

Author Affiliations

Pediatrist to Atlantic City Hospital ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;39(6):1295-1298. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930180145014

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Abstract

In the year 1721, vaccination against smallpox was introduced into England by Lady Mary Wortley Montague, wife of the British ambassador to Turkey, whose 3 year old son was successfully inoculated in Constantinople, where the procedure had been in use for nearly a century. When it was first introduced into England, some of the clergy were among the formidable opposers and publicly preached against the practice as highly sinful. The Reverend Mr. Massey at St. Andrews, Holborn, on July 8, 1722, using as his text, Job ii, 7, preached against inoculation as derived from the devil, Satan being the first inoculator when he smote his victim with boils. However, it was after Jenner's immortal discovery, when it became obvious that smallpox was deprived of its accompanying terrors, that parliament ordered "that every infant shall be vaccinated within three months after its birth, unless the state of its health should render

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