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Case Reports
December 1930

STAPHYLOCOCCUS ALBUS SEPTICEMIA WITH OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE PUBIC BONE

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;40(6):1262-1268. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940060102009
Abstract

Septicemias caused by Staphylococcus are comparatively frequent, but those caused by the albus variety are rather uncommon. When they do occur, they are usually accompanied by numerous complications in the form of metastatic abscesses, and frequently terminate fatally or at least in some permanent disability.

Osteomyelitis of the pubic bone from any cause is rare. McWhorter1 reviewed ten cases of osteomyelitis of the pubis and ischium, four of which were his own. One patient died, and the others, after protracted illness, recovered, though two had serious complications. The case to be cited is of particular interest, because the patient recovered from the septicemia without other complications than the osteomyelitis and survived that without surgical intervention. He is now well and without disability.

REPORT OF CASE  History.—T. McP., aged 7, was admitted to the Eggleston Memorial Hospital on the morning of Aug. 21, 1929, with a tentative diagnosis of

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