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Progress in Pediatrics
January 1931

WHEEZING RESPIRATION IN CHILDRENBRONCHOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS ON STRIDOROUS AND ASTHMATOID BREATHING

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(1):153-157. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940070160019
Abstract

The wheezing to which the observations that are to follow refer is that heard at the open mouth of the patient, not by auscultation through the wall of the chest.

When in a child the lumen of every air passage is of normal area in cross-section, the child breathes so quietly that either a very close approach or the observation of movements is necessary to make certain that the child is breathing at all.

To produce a wheezing audible without auscultation, the lumen of the airway must be encroached on by tissues, secretions or a foreign substance. The wheezing may be described as rattling, bubbling, crowing, harsh, whistling, vibratory, stridorous or merely noisy. The sound may be heard on inspiration or on expiration or on both.

The character of the obstruction to the free noiseless passage of air can be determined in practically every case by tripartite conference of the

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