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Case Reports
February 1931

THE CLINICAL AND ROENTGENOLOGIC MANIFESTATIONS OF SCURVY IN A SEVEN YEAR OLD CHILD

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Roentgenology, Cleveland City Hospital, and the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Western Reserve University.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(2):337-343. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940080115008
Abstract

Poupart1 wrote one of the first descriptions of adult scurvy in 1669. He described crepitus in the epiphyses of bones, and noted that there were separations of the epiphyses from the shafts. Petit described similar cases in 1773.

In 1859, Moeller1 described a disease in infants characterized by swelling of the extremities, pseudoparalysis and bleeding of the gums. He thought that this disease was an acute form of rickets. In 1883, Barlow1 recognized the scorbutic origin of the disease described by Moeller, and proved his statements anatomically. However, there was still much confusion between rickets and scurvy, probably because the diseases occurred together so frequently. As time went on cases of Moeller-Barlow disease were observed in infants who did not have rickets, and the identity of this disease and adult scurvy was definitely recognized. The German literature still calls infantile scurvy the Moeller-Barlow disease.

There have been

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