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Case Reports
April 1931

MENINGITIS DUE TO BACILLUS ACIDI-LACTICI IN A NEW-BORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
Read before the Bronx Pediatric Society, Oct. 9, 1929.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(4):862-865. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940100118012
Abstract

Bacillus acidi-lactici is a gram-negative bacillus closely allied to the colon bacillus group. It is frequently found in the intestinal canal, and is usually considered to be a harmless saprophyte without pathogenic significance. It may be present in water, and is commonly present in milk.1

Greenthal2 reported a case of meningitis due to Bacillus acidi-lactici that occurred in a premature colored girl, aged 1 month. The weight at birth was 4 pounds (1,814 Gm.). There were generalized convulsions, apathy, a bulging fontanel and, later, stupor. The infant refused feedings and appeared ill. There was no fever, vomiting, stiffness of the neck or retraction of the head, and no Kernig sign. The lumbar puncture yielded a thick, pure white, purulent fluid from which Bacillus acidi-lactici was recovered on culture. Death occurred on the eighth day after the onset of symptoms. At postmortem examination, Bacillus acidi-lactici was recovered from the

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