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June 1931

THE MORO REFLEX AS A DIAGNOSTIC AID IN FRACTURE OF THE CLAVICLE IN THE NEW-BORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Pediatrics, Rush Medical College of the University of Chicago, and the Presbyterian Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(6):1304-1306. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940120041003
Abstract

Fracture of the clavicle in the new-born infant is the most frequent fracture occurring during delivery. Statistics show that this fracture occurs in 1 per cent of all births. It may result from manipulation during delivery, but it is by no means rare in spontaneous birth, especially when the mother is a multipara. Nothing may attract the attention to the defect, as the infant uses the arm on the affected side without apparent discomfort. At first, crepitation is easily obtained, and there may be slight swelling at the point of fracture. By the end of the second week, the formation of callus becomes prominent enough to be noticed, and it is embarrassing to attempt to explain to the mother why this condition was not diagnosed previously.

Moro1 first described the embrace reflex that bears his name. He found that on placing an infant on a table and then forcibly

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