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November 1931

LATE RESPIRATORY FAILURE OF IMMATURE INFANTS TREATED SUCCESSFULLY IN DRINKER RESPIRATOR

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Gynecean Hospital Institute of Gynecologic Research and the Philadelphia Lying-In Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;42(5):1075-1078. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940180025002
Abstract

In a recent publication, Dr. Murphy made the initial report on the use of a modified Drinker respirator in the treatment of five infants suffering from asphyxia neonatorum.1

The Drinker respirator, shown in the accompanying illustration, is an apparatus for carrying on prolonged artificial respiration. The principle on which it works is as follows (quoted from the first report):

The patient is placed in a metal box or respirator, with his head protruding from one end through a snugly fitting rubber collar. When the respirator is closed, the body is in a relatively air-tight container, with the head exposed to room air. By means of an electrically driven air pump and valve arrangement, changes of air pressure are induced within the respirator. Thus, moderate degrees of accurately measured negative pressure are made to alternate rhythmically with atmospheric pressure. When negative pressure is applied, air at atmospheric pressure enters the

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