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November 1931

EFFECT OF SODIUM CITRATE ON THE LOSS OF WEIGHT IN THE NEW-BORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

SANTA BARBARA, CALIF.
From the Santa Barbara Clinic.

Am J Dis Child. 1931;42(5):1079-1085. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940180029003
Abstract

Many new-born infants have a so-called "inanition temperature" occurring on the third or fourth day, usually the day of greatest loss in weight following birth. This condition is thought to be a result of dehydration and lack of food. In addition to fever, these infants are drowsy, do not nurse well and vomit food and water, and there is a sweet odor to their breaths. The treatment for this condition formerly was forced fluids, one-half drachm (2 cc.) of castor oil, and colonic flushing, which, in most cases, increased the vomiting and the acidosis and prolonged the condition. During the fall of 1929 such "inanition temperatures" developed in several new-born infants in our care, and we treated them for acidosis. They were given fairly large doses of sodium citrate, with such good results that a routine order was given to have each 2 ounces (59.2 cc.) of lactose water contain

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