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Case Reports
February 1932

MULTIPLE TUBERCULOUS LESIONS IN THE BRAIN OF A CHILD (TUBERCULOUS ENCEPHALITIS)

Author Affiliations

DETROIT; PENSACOLA, FLA.
From the Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, and the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute.

Am J Dis Child. 1932;43(2):396-402. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1932.01950020128014
Abstract

Tuberculous lesions in the brain are not uncommon in children. Such lesions usually occur singly. Friedenwald and Greenfeld,1 however, reviewed the literature and cited several instances of multiple tuberculous lesions. Their own patient, a Negro boy of 7 with generalized tuberculosis, had five lesions, from 0.75 cm. to 2 cm. in diameter, at various locations in the cerebral hemispheres, and a very early meningeal involvement. Death occurred seven months after the first of a series of epileptiform seizures. Other instances of multiple lesions have been reported by Thiele2 (five lesions), Dalton3 (three lesions), Stevens4 (from six to eight lesions), Sachs,5 Combe6 and Ewald.7 In some instances there were localizing symptoms; in others, none. In Sach's patient, there was extensive degeneration of the fiber tracts of the spinal cord.

The following case is unusual because of the large number of brain lesions without localizing

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