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July 1932

IRON IN THE LIVER AND IN THE SPLEEN AFTER DESTRUCTION OF BLOOD AND TRANSFUSIONS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1932;44(1):81-105. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1932.01950080091009
Abstract

While making a microscopic study in the pigments of liver, I was impressed with the frequency of hemosiderosis of the liver in young infants as contrasted with its rarity in the liver of adults. Accordingly, I made a microscopic study of the liver and spleen in 100 recent cases that came to autopsy at the Babies' Hospital.1 The presence of iron in the liver and spleen was determined and the amount estimated by staining with an acidified solution of potassium ferrocyanide for from twenty to thirty minutes.2 The presence of iron is indicated by its combination with the ferrocyanide to form prussian blue. The clinical facts with regard to hemoglobin, red blood cells, transfusions of blood, etc., were obtained from the histories and were tabulated. From a study of these tables several significant correlations became apparent. In the instances in which transfusions had been given during life (30

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