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November 1932

ANTITOXIN CONTENT OF THE BLOOD SERUM OF CHILDREN WITH NEGATIVE REACTIONS TO THE SCHICK TEST

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Pediatric Department of Mount Sinai Hospital, Service of Dr. Béla Schick.

Am J Dis Child. 1932;44(5):999-1006. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1932.01950120081005
Abstract

Prior to 1912, all the methods available for determining the presence of diphtheria antitoxin in the human blood involved the use of inoculations into guinea-pigs. In that year Schick1 published the results of his studies on a test with which it was possible to demonstrate the specific antitoxin in the blood and tissues by the simple means of an intracutaneous injection of diphtheria toxin. With this method, now so well known as the Schick test, it became possible to divide human beings into two great classes from the point of view of immunity to diphtheria: (1) those with negative reactions to the Schick test whose blood contained an antitoxin titer of 1/30 unit or more per cubic centimeter of serum and who were immune to clinical diphtheria, and (2) those with positive reactions to the Schick test whose blood contained an insufficient amount of antitoxin and who were liable

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