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January 1933

CHEMICAL ACTION OF SODIUM CITRATE AS A CAUSE OF CERTAIN TRANSFUSION REACTIONS

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the departments of pediatrics and physiology, Vanderbilt University Hospital and Medical School.

Am J Dis Child. 1933;45(1):32-40. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1933.01950140042004
Abstract

During the past few years we have gained the impression that occasionally an acutely ill infant is made definitely worse rather than better by a transfusion of citrated blood. Most of these unfavorable results were observed in infants with acute gastro-intestinal disturbances. With one exception, which will be described in more detail, the effects of transfusion could hardly be described as a "transfusion reaction." There were no symptoms similar to those following the injection of incompatible blood, nor was there any suggestion of an allergic reaction, but rather an augmentation of the general unfavorable condition. Citrated transfusions were employed only after careful cross-matching of the donor's and the recipient's serum and cells. Rematching of blood in the cases giving unfavorable results failed to show any indication of incompatibility.

The one instance of a fatality immediately following transfusion convinced us that the transfusion was to blame, and led to the present

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