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June 1933

INFANTS BORN OF WOMEN HAVING TOXEMIA AS A COMPLICATION OF PREGNANCY

Am J Dis Child. 1933;45(6):1223-1228. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1933.01950190065008

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Abstract

The material for the present study was obtained from the records of the Manhattan Maternity and Dispensary, covering a period of six years (from 1921 to 1926, inclusive) and consisting of 148 cases. In order to evaluate the possible effect on the baby, it is necessary to understand the three types of toxemia which may occur in the mother. The classification used at this hospital and the number of cases in each group are as follows: preeclamptic toxemia, 92 cases; nephritic toxemia, 37 cases, and eclampsia, 19 cases.

TYPES OF COMPLICATION  Preeclamptic Toxemia.—This type, more frequent in primiparae but occasionally found in multiparae, occurs only in the latter half of pregnancy, and if not treated often leads to eclampsia. It is marked by a rise in the maternal blood pressure, with albumin and sometimes casts in the urine; these symptoms disappear shortly after delivery.Of the 92 patients in

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