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Case Reports
August 1933

RUPTURE OF THE GASTROCOLIC OMENTUM AS A COMPLICATION OF WHOOPING COUGH

Author Affiliations

FRESNO, CALIF.

Am J Dis Child. 1933;46(2):346-349. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1933.01960020109009
Abstract

The complications of whooping cough are numerous and varied. Rarely, however, does the rupture of an abdominal viscus occur during this disease as the result of severe coughing. The following case is an illustration of this unique complication.

REPORT OF CASE  History.—In consultation with Dr. Charles A. James, I saw a poorly nourished girl, 2 years of age, in the third week of an attack of whooping cough. Two days previously she had an unusually severe attack of coughing which terminated in a convulsion. Following the convulsion the child remained pale, weak and restless. The temperature of the outside atmosphere at this time, midsummer, reached a daily maximum of about 110 F. (43.3 C.). This fact was significant, because fluids given by mouth were not retained, and the child became dehydrated and presented the symptoms of high intestinal or pyloric obstruction. The temperature rose to 105 F. (40.5 C.).

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