[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.187.2. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 1933

IMPORTANCE OF THE CAT IN THE TRANSMISSION OF DIPHTHERIA

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the Biological Division, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1933;46(6):1338-1342. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1933.01960070104007
Abstract

The relation which cats bear to the transmission of diphtheria has been questioned for many years. Reports by Low,1 Jewett,2 Barras,3 Porter,4 Simmons,5 Gwynn,6 Osborne,7 Symes,8 Turner9 and Priestley,10 as well as several editorials11 in medical journals, lend support to the belief that cats are capable of spreading the disease.

Investigations by Simmons,5 Klein,12 Renshaw,13 Welch and Abbott,14 Remlinger15 and Karlinski16 (quoted by Wharton17) tend to indicate that cats can contract and spread diphtheria. The most recent work, however, that reported by Savage18 in 1920, contradicts these early experiments.

EXPERIMENTS  Schick Test.—The Schick test was done on thirty-nine kittens and thirty-one cats, twice the concentration of the adult Schick dosage being used. The results in all the animals were negative after twenty-four, forty-eight and ninety-six hours.Susceptibility of Cats to

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×