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February 1934

RELIEF OF OLIGURIA IN DEHYDRATION IN INFANTS BY INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF DEXTROSE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; WORCESTER, MASS.
From the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College, and the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;47(2):331-341. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960090072005
Abstract

Investigations on dehydration accompanying infantile diarrhea during the last few years have revealed the great significance of the acidosis which is so often present. Czerny1 was the first to call attention to this acidosis when he pointed out the similarity of the deep breathing which frequently occurs to that seen in dogs poisoned with mineral acids. Howland and Marriott2 confirmed this observation when they found that the alveolar carbon dioxide tension and ph of the serum of dehydrated infants were much lower than normal. Chemical examination of the blood by Schloss and Stetson3 revealed a decreased carbon dioxide content. Later workers4 have abundantly confirmed these reports.

There are several possible explanations for this acidosis. Czerny and Keller5 believed that it was due to an abnormal concentration of organic acids in the blood as the result of unusual metabolism or unusual absorption from the intestines.

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