Other Articles
August 1934


Author Affiliations

From the Pittsburgh Skin and Cancer Foundation.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;48(2):269-271. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960150028002

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The contagious and auto-inoculable character of the pyogenic infections of the skin causes a great deal of inconvenience, especially in school children, among whom dissemination both by direct and by indirect contact occurs readily. The interchange of pencils, pens, playthings, etc., assumes an important rôle in this contagion.

Inconvenience is occasioned by the loss of time incurred when, after a diagnosis of pyogenic infection is made, the pupil is excluded from classroom activities.

The most important of the group of pyogenic infections is impetigo contagiosa, but under this grouping we include ecthyma and infectious eczematoid dermatitis also.

Impetigo contagiosa is caused by invasion of the upper strata of the skin by staphylococci or streptococci. The condition begins in the form of small or large blisters. The roof of such a blister is very thin, so that on the slightest injury it ruptures. The content of the blister, which is a

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