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Case Reports
August 1934

SEPTIC ENDOCARDITIS IN AN INFANT SEVEN WEEKS OF AGE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Harriet Lane Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;48(2):355-358. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960150114010
Abstract

Endocarditis in infancy is rare, but when it occurs it is more often associated with a septic than with a rheumatic process.1 Many such involvements are not discovered until autopsy, because the heart frequently reveals no enlargement and no murmurs. When murmurs do occur, one's first thought is of congenital malformation of the heart. In the case reported here every one who listened to the heart commented on the fact that the murmur sounded more like that of an acquired lesion than like that of one of congenital origin; even so no one gave serious consideration to the possibility of infectious endocarditis.

REPORT OF CASE  History.—H. J., a male Negro baby, aged 7 weeks, was admitted to the Harriet Lane Home on Dec. 18, 1931, because of labored and irregular breathing. The family history was essentially unimportant. The infant was born at full term and weighed 5 pounds

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