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December 1934

DENTAL DECAY AS AN INDICATOR OF A DIETARY FAULT

Author Affiliations

HONOLULU, H. I.
From the Research Department of the Queen's Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;48(6):1228-1233. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960190048005
Abstract

During the last four years we have observed the effect of unusually one-sided diets on human teeth as well as on growth and general health. A series of articles have been written on our findings, especially in regard to a peculiar form of dental decay called odontoclasia, which affects the deciduous teeth. That this condition or any type of dental decay is caused entirely or partially by diet has long been a matter of contention. Soft food has been regarded as a cause by some, and sugar, heredity, lack of calcium or disturbance of the calcium-phosphorus ratio and deficiency in various vitamins, especially in vitamins C and D, by others. Mothers have usually accepted the decay of deciduous teeth as nature's way of getting rid of the weak milk teeth. In a previous paper1 attention was called to the excellent teeth of the ancient Hawaiians. The teeth of 22

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