Other Articles
January 1935


Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, and Duke Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(1):72-78. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970010081008

A discussion of the subject of the elimination of milk-borne disease involves the answering of four question: 1. What diseases are milk-borne? 2. How frequent are outbreaks of milk-borne disease? 3. What is being done to reduce the frequency of milk-borne disease? 4. How can the milk supply be made absolutely safe and still be within the means of the majority?

What Diseases Are Milk-Borne? Epidemics of the following diseases definitely have been proved to have originated from the drinking of milk: Brucella infection (undulant or Malta fever), diphtheria, foot and mouth disease, scarlet fever, septic or streptococcic sore throat, tuberculosis and typhoid and paratyphoid A and B fever. Bacillary dysentery, especially in children, also is a milk-borne disease, but the milk is contaminated more often in the home than in a dairy.

How Frequent Are Outbreaks of Milk-Borne Disease? In America from 1881 to 1927, 791 outbreaks of milk-borne

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