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February 1935

ANAPHYLACTOGENIC PROPERTIES OF MALTED SUGARS AND CORN SYRUP

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York University, and the Children's Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(2):307-317. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970020022002
Abstract

It has generally been held that only such food substances as contain protein constituents are capable of producing those altered reactions in man which are grouped under the common term allergy. However, there has recently appeared a preparation of dextrimaltose sugar purported to be nonallergic, and the question has been raised as to whether food substances so widely used in infant feeding and ordinarily designated as being carbohydrates may give rise to exacerbations in the allergic person. The substances most commonly used in infant feeding are preparations of malt extracts, of dextrimaltose and of corn syrup. In this study we undertook to determine their anaphylactogenic properties.

EXPERIMENTAL DATA  Method.—The anaphylaxis method was used in these experiments. Normal guinea-pigs weighing from 250 to 350 Gm. were employed. All the animals were obtained from a reliable source and were raised on a known diet which did not contain barley, corn, wheat

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