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March 1935

DICK TEST AND BLOOD AGAR CULTURES AS AIDS IN DIAGNOSIS OF SCARLET FEVER

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine, the Cook County Contagious Disease Hospital, the Wallace R. Lane Fund of the Scarlet Fever Committee and the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(3):603-610. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970030049004
Abstract

During the nine years since its introduction, the Dick test has proved to be a reliable test for susceptibility to scarlet fever. Among about 20,000 persons tested by the Scarlet Fever Committee, none with an original negative reaction to the Dick test has contracted scarlet fever.1 No nurse at the Cook County Hospital with a negative reaction to the Dick test has contracted scarlet fever, while several whose reactions were positive contracted the disease before they were immunized.2 At the round table conference on scarlet fever of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held on May 13, 1932, it was brought out that of 953 susceptible nurses immunized to the point of a negative reaction to the Dick test by one of the members none had had scarlet fever, while several nurses who had been incompletely immunized had had the disease.3

Confusion of opinion exists, however, in regard

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