[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.227.36. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Body Build in Infants
April 1935

VIII. INFLUENCE OF RETARDED GROWTH ON THE DIMENSIONS OF THE ULNA AND THE RADIUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Diseases of Children, New York University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and the Children's Medical Service, Bellevue Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(4):876-883. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970040044005
Abstract

That a reduction in the amount of soft tissues results from undernutrition is well known. The bony skeleton, however, is often looked on as being relatively fixed hereditarily; indeed, the body proportions are widely used by the anthropologist as an index of racial origin. That this concept is erroneous was shown in 1912 by Boas,1 who demonstrated a change in the cephalic index of the offspring of immigrants to America. More recently it was shown that undernutrition in infants results in a change in the proportions of the external dimensions (measured from bony points), undernourished infants becoming more "linear" than well nourished infants of the same racial origin and from the same social environment.2

In the present study the influence of undernutrition on the configuration, relations and texture of the ulna and radius was studied. The infants used in this study have been described in the two preceding

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×