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May 1935

INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS

Author Affiliations

Pathologist, Mount Sinai Hospital CHICAGO
From the Pathological Laboratory of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(5):1222-1231. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970050120013
Abstract

The finding by Paul and Bunnell1 of an increase of heterophilic antibodies in the blood of patients suffering from infectious mononucleosis is a most important contribution to the knowledge of the disease. Repeated confirmatory reports bear out such a statement (Bunnell,2 Rosenthal and Wenkebach3).

A case is presented to demonstrate the value of an examination of the serum for heterophilic antibodies.

REPORT OF A CASE  History.—A 19 year old white youth was admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital on Sept. 28, 1933, complaining of pain in the abdomen and the right axilla for five days and of swelling in the right axilla for three days. The pain in the abdomen was at first generalized; it then became localized in the lower portion. The patient had a feeling of distention, but there was no nausea or vomiting. Constipation, lasting three days, was terminated by a cathartic. The

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