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Beta Hemolytic Streptococcic Infection in Infancy and in Childhood
June 1935

II. EFFECT OF TRANSFUSED BLOOD AND OF STREPTOCOCCIC ANTISERUM ON THE CONCENTRATIONS OF ANTIFIBRINOLYSIN AND ANTISTREPTOLYSIN IN THE BLOOD OF THE RECIPIENTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(6):1430-1437. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970060034003
Abstract

Blood transfusions are employed almost universally in the treatment of patients with severe hemolytic streptococcic infections. For this purpose, blood of three different types has come into general use, i. e., blood from nonimmune persons, from convalescents and from donors prepared by vaccination.

Numerous clinical reports justify the use of blood from nonimmune donors, especially when the patient is anemic or suffering from a prolonged illness. Of particular interest in relation to the present study are the investigations of erysipelas in childhood by Schaffer and Rothman1 and the review of the therapeutic value of transfusions in scarlet fever by Look.2 These authors support the generally accepted opinion that blood from normal, healthy donors is of value in these infections.

The literature of the past forty years contains a large number of reports on the use of blood from convalescent patients in the treatment of patients with scarlet fever.

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