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October 1935

OPHTHALMOSCOPIC APPEARANCE OF THE NERVE HEAD IN THE NEW-BORN AND IN THE YOUNG INFANT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;50(4):872-878. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970100048004
Abstract

Jaeger1 first pointed out that the optic disk of the new-born infant may appear gray on ophthalmoscopic examination. Sicherer and Stumpf2 and Koenigstein3 corroborated Jaeger's findings and indicated that this gray color of the optic nerve head changes in the first few days of life to the adult pink appearance.

The importance of knowing that the optic nerve head of the newborn infant looks different from that of the adult and that its grayish color may under normal circumstances persist for a much longer period than the first few days of life was first brought to the attention of one of us (S. K.) in the following observations:

REPORT OF CASES  Case 1.—B. S. was normally born, weighing 8 pounds (3,628.73 Gm.). Within the first two days of life icterus gravis developed associated with convulsions and generalized spasticity. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed gray optic disks which were interpreted

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