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March 1936

CHANGES IN THE RATE OF THE HUMAN FETAL HEART IN RESPONSE TO VIBRATORY STIMULI

Author Affiliations

YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO
From the Samuel S. Fels Fund.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;51(3):583-589. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970150087006
Abstract

That the human fetus is capable of perceiving sound vibrations and of responding to them by movements of the extremities has previously been reported. Forbes and Forbes1 reported the case of a woman who while attending musical concerts felt a great deal of fetal movement whenever the audience applauded. Peiper2 reported an increase of fetal activity immediately following certain sound stimuli. Ray,3 in an attempt to condition the human fetus, elicited a movement response to the sound of two boards clapping together. We4 reported the movement response of the fetus to sound by months during the last three months of intra-uterine life. We5 demonstrated the existence of this response at an earlier age than it had generally been assumed to be present. Minkowski6 and others have demonstrated on premature human fetuses from interrupted pregnancies the presence of a tactile sense and a response to

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