[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 1936

THE HISTOLOGIC ASPECT OF EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS PRODUCED VIA THE GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, and aided in part by a grant received from the President's Birthday Ball Commission for Infantile Paralysis Research.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;52(6):1361-1374. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.04140060071007
Abstract

An excellent review of the histologic and pathologic features of poliomyelitis is contained in Faber's monograph.1 He considered and reviewed the various theories of the propagation of the virus. The theory that the virus spreads along the nerve axons, suggested by Römer2 and demonstrated by Hurst3 and Fairbrother and Hurst,4 is the theory of Faber's choice and is the theory best fitted to explain the spread of the virus in the human being and in the experimental animal.

Hurst3 injected the virus intracerebrally into eighteen Macacus rhesus monkeys, and sections were taken at the onset of symptoms. Subsequently ten animals were studied4 to ascertain the manner of propagation of the virus. The latter animals were killed after varying intervals, and sections were taken and studied histologically.

This paper is a report on the histologic and pathologic aspects of poliomyelitis found in Macacus rhesus monkeys

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×