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May 1937

INGESTION OF VITAMINS A, B. C AND D AND POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, and aided in part by grants received from the S. M. A. Corporation and the Cleveland Foundation.

Am J Dis Child. 1937;53(5):1202-1208. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.04140120026002
Abstract

Some investigators have expressed the opinion that protection against poliomyelitis is a maturation phenomenon.1 Others have stated the belief that protection bears some relation to the physical make-up of the human being.2 Some of the histories of cases of poliomyelitis that I have studied suggested a correlation between the lack of certain vitamins and resistance to the disease.3 It was decided that before experimentation was done with diets deficient in vitamins it would be wise to determine if the feeding of large amounts of vitamins would have any effect on protection.

EXPERIMENTS  Experiment 1.—In September 1933, ten Macacus rhesus monkeys were obtained soon after they had been weaned. Their weights ranged from 900 to 1,020 Gm., and according to the weight tables of Schultz,4 the monkeys must have averaged approximately from 6 to 7 months of age. From October 4 to 7, five of the animals

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