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June 1937

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE RESULTS OF TONSILLECTOMY AND ADENOIDECTOMYA STUDY OF FIVE HUNDRED AND FORTY CHILDREN, CORRELATING THE PREOPERATIVE COMPLAINTS, THE AGE OF THE CHILD, THE TYPE OF TONSILS AND MICROSCOPIC STUDY OF THE TONSILS WITH THE POSTOPERATIVE RESULTS

Author Affiliations

EL PASO, TEXAS
From the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute and the Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

Am J Dis Child. 1937;53(6):1503-1520. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.04140130081009
Abstract

Disappointing results following tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are common, perhaps unnecessarily so. Diverse results in apparently similar cases are common enough to have led Dean1 to say before a recent national meeting of otolaryngologists: "Practically, the removal of tonsils is always a gamble." No one disagreed with him. Yet there must be differences between the children who are benefited by tonsillectomy and those who are not. A knowledge of those differences should decrease the number of disappointing results.

It was with the hope of gaining an understanding of at least some of those differences that this study, in which 540 children were seen before and after their operations for a period of two years, was made.

There were two objects in mind. The first object, as already intimated, was to determine, if possible, what points in the history of the case and in the appearance of the throat are significant

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