[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 1937

RESULTS OF BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS IN PRIMARY PNEUMONIA IN INFANTS AND IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the department of pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, and the Duke Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1937;54(1):23-28. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.01980010032003
Abstract

The intravenous administration of any appreciable quantity of fluid in cases of pneumonia has usually been considered a hazardous procedure because it increases the load of an already overtaxed myocardium and pulmonary circulation. However, there is little ground for the belief that the circulation will be embarrassed by transfusions at a time when the total circulating volume is decreased. To normal dogs with vascular beds that contained the normal quota of blood, Meek and Eyster1 gave intravenous injections of whole blood, physiologic solution of sodium chloride and solution of acacia in quantities varying from 25 to 103 per cent of the total blood volume without increasing permanently the diastolic size of the heart as demonstrated by roentgen ray measurements. Estimations of the hemoglobin content indicated that most of the injected fluid was still in circulation; the capillaries and venules acted as reservoirs for the storage of excess fluid. Rose

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×