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October 1937

RATE OF APPOSITION OF ENAMEL AND DENTIN, MEASURED BY THE EFFECT OF ACUTE FLUOROSIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Histology, University of Illinois College of Dentistry, and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the Research and Educational Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1937;54(4):757-776. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1937.01980040061005
Abstract

Recent findings on the effect of fluorosis on the growing teeth of lower animals paved the way for this quantitative study of the rate of apposition of human enamel and dentin.

REVIEW OF THE DENTAL EFFECTS OF FLUOROSIS  Historical Summary.—For many years a type of hypoplasia of the enamel known as mottled enamel was a challenging problem to members of the dental profession. The condition was endemic and characterized by a destructive chalky opacity and pitting of the enamel. Black and McKay,1 in 1916, first attempted to elucidate the underlying cause of this dental defect, and they were instrumental in initiating the large amount of research that followed. In 1931 Churchill suggested and Smith and her associates2 established by experiments on animals that chronic fluoride intoxication was the direct cause of mottled teeth.Churchill arrived at his discovery by a direct approach, when he analyzed the water

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