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Case Reports
March 1938

INFECTIONS WITH SALMONELLA SUIPESTIFER (HOG CHOLERA BACILLUS) IN CHILDHOODWITH REPORT OF A CASE OF BILATERAL SUBDURAL ABSCESS ENDING IN RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Children's Memorial Hospital and the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute Laboratory.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;55(3):553-558. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980090101011
Abstract

Salmonella suipestifer is rapidly becoming recognized as a pathogen of considerable importance to man. It has long been known as the secondary invader in hog cholera, a disease due to a filtrable virus. When infections from S. suipestifer do take place in man, they may occur in either epidemic or sporadic form.

Epidemics have been reported from many parts of the world and have been characterized by gastro-enteritis or a mild typhoid-like course. Such outbreaks have been traced to the consumption of contaminated food;1 for example, an outbreak2 in Germany which involved one hundred and three persons was due to ice cream contaminated with bacillus suipestifer. In this country a comparable epidemic was traced to the consumption of unpasteurized milk.3 Similarly, smaller outbreaks have been due directly to contaminated pork or to foods secondarily contaminated by the cook who had been handling infected pork.1

Since the

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