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June 1938

URINARY OUTPUT OF VITAMIN C OF NORMAL AND OF SICK CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO
From the Department of Pediatrics of the Buffalo City Hospital and the University of Buffalo School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1938;55(6):1212-1220. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1938.01980120074006
Abstract

Cevitamic acid (ascorbic acid, ascorbinic acid [German] or vitamin C) is one of the vitamins whose composition is known. In 1928 von Szent-Györgyi1 isolated from plants and the cortex of animals adrenals a crystalline substance which he called hexuronic acid. Hexuronic acid was renamed ascorbic acid in 1933. At the present time the synthetic form of cevitamic acid, which takes its origin from dextrose, is clinically available and has been successfully used in the treatment of scurvy and allied conditions.2

Scientific interest in cevitamic acid has renewed interest in scurvy, a disease which, judging from clinical criteria, has come to be considered an interesting but rare clinical entity both in this country and in England.3 While it is generally agreed that clinical scurvy is now rare, it is also agreed that various signs and symptoms associated with nutritional disorders in children and in some adults are related

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