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February 1939

EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS IN MONKEYS LACKING OLFACTORY NERVE CONNECTIONS WITH CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMPRODUCED BY INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF VIRUS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University, and the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(2):338-342. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990020096009
Abstract

When Macacus rhesus monkeys are given intravenous injections of poliomyelitis virus, they occasionally contract the disease. In order to explain the pathogenesis, it has been suggested that the virus is excreted "from the blood stream onto the nasal mucosa, where it enters the endings of the olfactory nerves and migrates to the central nervous system."1 If this explanation were correct, the corollary should also be true that if the olfactory connections were absent, the disease could not be produced by the intravenous injection of virus.

It has been shown, however, that monkeys whose olfactory connections were covered with 1 per cent zinc sulfate by intranasal instillation nevertheless acquired poliomyelitis when the virus was subsequently injected intravenously.2 From this evidence it was concluded that blocking the nasal olfactory area does not prevent the production of the disease when the virus is injected intravenously and that the explanation of the

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