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March 1939

EXPERIMENTAL PARALYSIS IN MONKEYS COMPLETELY RECOVERED FROM POLIOMYELITISPRODUCED BY CULTURES OF MATERIAL FROM PATIENTS WITH MEASLES

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND; DETROIT
From the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University, and the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, Cleveland, and the Department of Anatomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(3):541-545. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990030055005
Abstract

It has been stated that there are few second attacks of poliomyelitis.1 However, reports of such attacks can be found in the literature. It has been suggested that in many cases the paralyses have been due not to actual reinfection with the virus of poliomyelitis but to some other acute infectious disease which involved the few peripheral nerve fibers remaining after the previous severe attack of poliomyelitis.1 As a result, the same objective findings would be noted with the second as with the first attack of paralysis. Macacus rhesus monkeys that contract poliomyelitis sometimes recover with massive atrophies. The object of the experiments described in this article was to determine if paralyses would again develop if these animals were subsequently inoculated with the causative factor of some acute infectious disease.

MATERIAL AND METHODS  Thirteen animals, most of which had recovered from a severe attack of poliomyelitis, were used

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